Stacey Bowers


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Stacey Bowers is an American entrepreneur. Stacey started Bang-Up Betty in 2013 and is based in North Little Rock, Arkansas.[1]

Stacey Bowers, founder of Bang-Up BettyStacey Bowers, founder of Bang-Up Betty

Company

Bang-Up Betty

Twitter

@bangupbetty (1.13K followers)

Instagram

@bangupbetty (10.4K followers)

Career

Early Career

No early career info added yet...

Bang-Up Betty

Stacey started Bang-Up Betty in 2013. They detail the beginnings of their company in their Starter Story interview: [1]

Q: How did you get started on Bang-Up Betty?

When I began making jewelry, I had no intention of starting a business.

I bought some steel stamps, took an old paint-splattered hammer my dad had given me, and watched a lot of videos on YouTube about how to stamp metal.

I just wanted to make some funny holiday gifts for my friends with silly phrases and curse words on them.

> You don’t have to please everyone, and that staying true to yourself and your designs can be way more important than trying to make everyone happy.

At the time I was working as a writer and editor for a local magazine. Writing and language have always given me life, so I think gravitating towards jewelry with words and phrases came naturally to me. I actually didn’t really wear a lot of jewelry until I started making it. I just wasn’t really drawn to pretty baubles. I prefered funny, bold and meaningful.

The first things I ever stamped were copper bracelets that I called “Four Letter Word Bracelets.” They said things like “STFU,” “OMFG,” and “MILF.” (That last one seemed to be particularly upsetting to some people who I quickly learned were probably not my target audience.)

I may have offended some people right off the bat, but so many other people wanted the bracelets. It taught me that you don’t have to please everyone, and that staying true to yourself and your designs can be way more important than trying to make everyone happy.

Whatever your product is, it’s just not going to be for everyone. So I really lean into the people that it IS for. It’s a lot easier when you sell something you just love and love to make.

Source [1]

References