Shai Schechter


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Shai Schechter is an American entrepreneur. Shai started RightMessage in 2018 and is based in Remote.[1]

Shai Schechter, founder of RightMessageShai Schechter, founder of RightMessage

Company

RightMessage

Twitter

@shaisc (840 followers)

Career

Early Career

No early career info added yet...

RightMessage

Shai started RightMessage in 2018. They detail the beginnings of their company in their Starter Story interview: [1]

Q: How did you get started on RightMessage?

I've always loved technology and I ran a few online businesses from my bedroom as a kid.

I founded an events company at university (when I should've been in lectures), and my love of software meant we were able to launch some pretty unique events… like a "Wall Street" nightclub where we installed screens and hacked the cash registers to make the drink prices rise and crash throughout the night. People loved it.

There's a lot to be said for building in public, keeping assumptions to a minimum, and iterating based on what you learn from your audience and their needs… It taught us so much about what the product needed to be, and more importantly what the product didn't need to be yet.

I started taking a lot of interest in online marketing, as a way to scale the web and events businesses… which eventually led to me transitioning the web consultancy to more of a marketing consultancy.

Again I'd bring those programming skills to the marketing space, and it gave me this powerful edge over other consultants.

I’d do things for clients like writing a few lines of code to make a marketing site show a more premium call-to-action to visitors who had already completed the basic one… and it drove these huge upticks in conversion rate.

Meanwhile, my friend Brennan (co-founder) had grown this huge online community for freelancers.

He's very much a marketer, but like me, he also had a programming background and had been hacking his site to do similar things with personalization. Like, he'd make his website ask visitors why they wanted his free course… and then use whatever reason they picked when promoting his paid course.

And like my clients, he was seeing his conversion rates skyrocket. 2x or 3x conversion rates on our first attempts weren’t at all unusual.

He was tweeting about all the things he was trying and the impact it was having, and a lot of marketers started following along. So he decided to launch an online course to teach marketers how to do similar things on their own sites.

It sold incredibly well.

People loved the concepts.

But when it got to the more technical parts they struggled to follow along. At which point the bigger companies would hire him to implement it for them… but most couldn't afford to. So he’s like:

What if there were a point-and-click tool for marketers to set all this up themselves on their sites, without writing any code?

Brennan and I started talking about packaging up the kinds of things we had been custom-coding for clients into a point-and-click tool any marketer could use on their own, and we agreed to team up and make it happen.

It was meant to just be a tiny side project: I'd build the tool, he'd bring his existing course audience, and we'd both keep running our existing companies full time.

Validation

We said we weren't writing a line of code unless we could get $10k of preorders in the bank… and thanks to the audience we’d built up through tweeting; a small amount of blogging; generally ranting about how things could be better to anyone who’d listen, we were able to make that happen in a matter of days. 6 weeks after that we had an incredibly crude but functional app to give them.

how-we-grew-our-saas-to-30k-mrr-in-one-year

We worked closely with those preorder customers to refine the product over the following 6 months, building in public as much as possible to build up the audience, and officially launched to our list in January 2018.

And as the feedback started rolling in we started to realize we might have something bigger on our hands than a little evening project…

Source [1]

References

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