Pat Stainke


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Pat Stainke is an American entrepreneur. Pat started The Language Delegate in 2013 and is based in Donna, Texas.[1]

Pat Stainke, founder of The Language DelegatePat Stainke, founder of The Language Delegate

Company

The Language Delegate

Career

Early Career

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The Language Delegate

Pat started The Language Delegate in 2013. They detail the beginnings of their company in their Starter Story interview: [1]

Q: How did you get started on The Language Delegate?

It was on a boat dock in Le Havre, France, that I first fell in love with Language. I had just turned ten, and my father had taken a post at the American Embassy. The two locals who met our ship were loading our luggage into the staff car bound for Paris. Spellbound, I watched as they waved their hands in the air, talking in tones and syllables I had never heard before. This new language was curious and beautiful at the same time! As I rubbed shoulders with a broad cross-section of people over the next few formative years—from local merchants to visiting dignitaries—I quickly discovered the unlimited potential of language.

No matter where our sphere of influence lies, we use language to break down barriers, level playing fields, embody personality, express goodwill, and to touch, attract, connect, and persuade. Although French was hard at first, I was fascinated with the endless mysteries and playfulness of language. I went on to study German, Spanish, and ASL. I later pursued my MA in Deaf Ed, because the challenge for deaf children hinges on language mastery. I have always loved to write, interpret, and teach. My greatest joy is to work with second language learners, equipping them with the skills they need to succeed in their chosen “life niches.”

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So Language is my thing. It carries the power to paint a picture of who we are, to build bridges to places we want to go, and to connect us to friends we have yet to meet.

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As the daughter of a foreign service officer, I was fortunate to learn other languages at a very young age. The experience of growing up in another country sowed several important seeds in my life. I learned a great deal about the people in my host countries and the distinguishing features that made their cultures unique. I learned to accept others at face value without judgment. These points of awareness and interpersonal skills have served me well as an on-site interpreter, an editor, and co-author. Although I do draw boundaries concerning the assignments I choose to take, I often have to suspend judgment when working with projects that represent experiences or a value system that differs from my own.

My first profession was as a teacher. After 30 years of teaching preschool deaf children, second grade in a Christian school, high school French, sign language for interpreters, and adult ESL classes, it was time for a new chapter. Once I left the classroom, I became fascinated with the world of marketing and personal branding. The combination of these interests has deepened my insight into what makes certain people tick, given me new perspectives on the motivations that drive them, and equipped me with a knack for discerning their unique ‘voice.’ Whether working as an editor or a co-author (in both fiction and non-fiction), I help my clients find just the right wording to develop their characters, the narratives those characters live in, and to draft a message with just the right tone. As we build our collaborative relationship, I also support them beyond my services as an editor. Adopting the mindset of a teacher-turned-writing coach, I routinely offer mini-lessons that help them become better writers as we enhance the skills they apply to their craft.

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One of the most rewarding aspects of my work is supporting those who are writing in their second language. I’ve worked as an interpreter and translator and have written documents in other languages, so I understand the challenges they face from the inside. It’s both a puzzle and a privilege to help my international clients polish things so they can make their mark in the letters and papers they write. I am nerdy enough to enjoy reading dictionaries and watch foreign movies for fun. But the real reason I write and edit for others is to give their words and ideas a decisive edge, enabling them to make a difference in their corner of the planet.

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A Delegate is one on a mission. An agent of goodwill, he acts as the representative of those who sent him and has a specific job to do. As the Language Delegate, my motto is My Mission: To Craft Your Message.

This means that I purpose to faithfully represent my clients, draw attention to their brand, and create valuable connections to their target readership.

For the Foreign Delegate, the mission is much more complex than the assigned task itself. Before the work can begin, he must invest himself in bridging cultures, learning the other’s language, and forging relationships. The process for the writer and editor is much the same. My authors know how they want to touch their readership—often with something that has the power to be transformative. But before that work can begin, they must bridge cultures, walk around in the world of their readers, learn the language which speaks to them and forge a relationship which will make transformation possible. I love the challenge of partnering with my authors as our dance results in transformative work!

Source [1]

References